Mr. Sensitive

June 13, 2011

Operation Lillypad – Day 1

Filed under: Uncategorized — lbej @ 19:02

The long-awaited pond campaign began with First and Fourth Armies converging on the near side of the pond to extract rocks from the murky depths.   Fourth Army is commanded by Justin and First Army is under my personal command.  I also have supreme command of the operation.  In fact, the Empire is presently under my personal control, a fact that I’m not happy about at all.  We have Charlotte’s Third Army in reserve through tomorrow, and some unenthusiastic hussars  should I vacate my faculties and decide to deploy them.

This was done in a cavalier fashion that might have resulted in more trouble than was fortunately the case.  Responsibility for that must fall upon headquarters, but the decision to proceed without gloves was not taken entirely without forethought.  There is something to be said for availing oneself of the tactile information the use of gloves would have precluded.  For my part, I discovered that the sliminess of the rocks and the pond liner was not nearly so repugnant as I expected, and I can now see myself wading exuberantly into the pond during the course of the campaign.   That will have to wait until the girls have departed and I am responsible only for myself, but I look forward to the event.  Once the rocks were removed from the shallows, we proceeded with a pincer manoeuvre executed by Fourth Army on the left bank of the pond in coordination with First Army along the right bank.  First Army liberated the grossbox and Fourth Army cleared out the area around the pumpbox.  Casualties were fairly heavy, with Fourth Army seeming to get the worst of it owing to heavy thorn emplacements.  But First Army ultimately took the most serious damage, as the unrestricted use of the garden shears created a stealth blister that was created and stripped inside of five minutes, leaving an open sore and severely limiting effectiveness.  Nevertheless, the objective—creation of a perimeter and extrication of the filtration pipe—was largely achieved by early afternoon.

First Army then kicked over the dead magnolia tree in a celebratory fashion.  Fourth Army took the lead in opening the pumpbox, revealing a horror show of ants and spiders, with webs hardened into tangible terror by the passage of time and diligent reapplication of evil.

This will have to be addressed, but it was judged that the ants should be given time to evacuate should they so choose.  A substantial tear in the lining along the back side of the pond was discovered, and this will be sealed in the coming days with a view towards a permanent rise in the water level.  The filters were all removed and left in the sun to dry.  The grossbox is gross.

We must empty it of water, but I have not settled upon the mechanism whereby this is to be achieved.  We will concentrate on the pumpbox tomorrow, but offensives to patch the lining, secure the pipe connections, and empty the grossbox may be made opportunistically.  The workings of the Dominion spiders were evident wherever one wished to look, but the spiders themselves stayed out of view, with a few exceptions.  A spider attempted to ascend the leg of First Army but the entire affair seemed to be accidental and hostilities were promptly contained.  Other items of note follow.

Behind the forward screen of thorns the plants in the back corner of the yard seem to be mostly blackberry bushes.

That makes me think of the Blackberry smartphone as I am typing it, and that makes me sad.  The blackberries are tasty regardless.

Finally, look how big that oak tree is.

Zondro was kind enough to provide perspective.

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1 Comment »

  1. Wow. Looks like a lot of work so far. Also, I didn’t know you like blackberries. And the tree does look so huge – especially since it hasn’t been that long since you posted the old pictures with a much smaller tree.

    Comment by Katie Eure — June 13, 2011 @ 19:27 | Reply


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